ray_apps_blog

November 25, 2009

More Oracle data types supported by ruby-plsql gem

Filed under: jruby,oracle,pl/sql,ruby — Raimonds Simanovskis @ 4:34 pm

I have just released ruby-plsql gem version 0.4.0 which provides many new features. You can read about initial versions of ruby-plsql in previous blog posts.

Oracle complex data type support

Initial versions of ruby-plsql supported just simple Oracle types like NUMBER, VARCHAR2, DATE, TIMESTAMP, CLOB, BLOB as PL/SQL procedure parameters. Now support for many more complex data types is added. See examples below how to call PL/SQL procedures with these complex data types.

PL/SQL Record

Let’s assume you have PL/SQL procedure with PL/SQL record type parameter (which most typically will be in table%ROWTYPE format):

CREATE TABLE test_employees (
          employee_id   NUMBER(15),
          first_name    VARCHAR2(50),
          last_name     VARCHAR2(50),
          hire_date     DATE
        );
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION test_full_name (p_employee test_employees%ROWTYPE)
RETURN VARCHAR2 IS
BEGIN
  RETURN p_employee.first_name || ' ' || p_employee.last_name;
END;

Then you can create Ruby Hash with record field values (specifying field names as Symbols), e.g.:

p_employee = {
  :employee_id => 1,
  :first_name => 'First',
  :last_name => 'Last',
  :hire_date => Time.local(2000,01,31)
}

and pass this Hash as a parameter which will be translated to PL/SQL record parameter by ruby-plsql:

plsql.test_full_name(p_employee) #=> "First Last"
# or
plsql.test_full_name(:p_employee => p_employee) #=> "First Last"

In the same way you can get PL/SQL function return values or output parameter values as Hash values.

Object type

In similar way also object type parameters can be passed as Hash values. In this case also nested objects or nested collections of objects are supported:

CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE t_address AS OBJECT (
  street    VARCHAR2(50),
  city      VARCHAR2(50),
  country   VARCHAR2(50)
);
CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE t_phone AS OBJECT (
  type            VARCHAR2(10),
  phone_number    VARCHAR2(50)
);
CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE t_phones AS TABLE OF T_PHONE;
CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE t_employee AS OBJECT (
  employee_id   NUMBER(15),
  first_name    VARCHAR2(50),
  last_name     VARCHAR2(50),
  hire_date     DATE,
  address       t_address,
  phones        t_phones
);
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION test_full_name (p_employee t_employee)
  RETURN VARCHAR2
IS
BEGIN
  RETURN p_employee.first_name || ' ' || p_employee.last_name;
END;

and from Ruby side you can call this PL/SQL function as:

p_employee = {
  :employee_id => 1,
  :first_name => 'First',
  :last_name => 'Last',
  :hire_date => Time.local(2000,01,31),
  :address => {:street => 'Main street 1', :city => 'Riga', :country => 'Latvia'},
  :phones => [{:type => 'mobile', :phone_number => '123456'}, {:type => 'home', :phone_number => '654321'}]
}
plsql.test_full_name(p_employee) #=> "First Last"
# or
plsql.test_full_name(:p_employee => p_employee) #=> "First Last"

And also object type return values and output parameters will be returned as Ruby Hash values (with nested Hashes or Arrays if necessary).

There is one limitation that these object types should be defined as database types and not just inside PL/SQL package definition. Unfortunately you cannot access type definitions inside packages from OCI or JDBC drivers and as a result cannot call such procedures from outside of PL/SQL.

TABLE and VARRAY collections

TABLE and VARRAY collection parameters can be passed as Array values:

CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE t_numbers AS TABLE OF NUMBER(15);
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION test_sum (p_numbers IN t_numbers)
  RETURN NUMBER
IS
  l_sum   NUMBER(15) := 0;
BEGIN
  IF p_numbers.COUNT > 0 THEN
    FOR i IN p_numbers.FIRST..p_numbers.LAST LOOP
      IF p_numbers.EXISTS(i) THEN
        l_sum := l_sum + p_numbers(i);
      END IF;
    END LOOP;
    RETURN l_sum;
  ELSE
    RETURN NULL;
  END IF;
END;

And from Ruby side:

plsql.test_sum([1,2,3,4]) #=> 10

CURSOR

You can get also cursor return values from PL/SQL procedures:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION test_cursor
  RETURN SYS_REFCURSOR
IS
  l_cursor  SYS_REFCURSOR;
BEGIN
  OPEN l_cursor FOR
  SELECT * FROM test_employees ORDER BY employee_id;
  RETURN l_cursor;
END;

can be called from Ruby in the following way:

plsql.test_cursor do |cursor|
  cursor.fetch #=> first row from test_employees will be returned
end

It is important to pass block parameter in this case and do something with returned cursor within this block as after ruby-plsql finishes PL/SQL procedure call it will close all open cursors and therefore it will not be possible to do anything with returned cursor outside this block.

It is also possible to use returned cursor as input parameter for another PL/SQL procedure:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION test_cursor_fetch(p_cursor SYS_REFCURSOR)
  RETURN test_employees%ROWTYPE
IS
  l_record  test_employees%ROWTYPE;
BEGIN
  FETCH p_cursor INTO l_record;
  RETURN l_record;
END;
plsql.test_cursor do |cursor|
  plsql.test_cursor_fetch(cursor) #=> first record as Hash
end

Note: you can pass cursors as PL/SQL procedure input parameter just when using ruby-plsql on MRI 1.8/1.9 with ruby-oci8, unfortunately I have not found a way how to pass cursor as input parameter when using JRuby and JDBC.

BOOLEAN

And finally you can use also PL/SQL BOOLEAN type – it is quite tricky data type as it is supported just by PL/SQL but not supported as data type in Oracle tables. But now you can also use it with ruby-plsql:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION test_boolean
  ( p_boolean BOOLEAN )
  RETURN BOOLEAN
IS
BEGIN
  RETURN p_boolean;
END;
plsql.test_boolean(true) #=> true

You can find more PL/SQL procedure call usage examples in ruby-plsql RSpec tests.

Table and sequence operations

I have been using and promoting to others ruby-plsql as PL/SQL procedure unit testing tool. As current PL/SQL unit testing tools are not so advanced and easy to use as Ruby unit testing tools then I like better to use Ruby testing tools (like RSpec) together with ruby-plsql to write short and easy to understand PL/SQL unit tests.

In unit tests in setup and teardown methods you typically need some easy way how to create some sample data in necessary tables as well as to validate resulting data in tables after test execution.

If you are Ruby on Rails developer then you probably will use ActiveRecord (or DataMapper) for manipulation of table data. But if Ruby is used just for unit tests then probably ActiveRecord would be too complicated for this task.

Therefore I added some basic table operations to ruby-plsql which might be useful e.g. in unit tests. Some syntax ideas for these table operations are coming from Sequel Ruby library.

INSERT

# insert one record
employee = { :employee_id => 1, :first_name => 'First', :last_name => 'Last', :hire_date => Time.local(2000,01,31) }
plsql.employees.insert employee # INSERT INTO employees VALUES (1, 'First', 'Last', ...)
# insert many records 
employees = [employee1, employee2, ... ]  # array of many Hashes
plsql.employees.insert employees

If primary key values should be selected from sequence then you can get next sequence values with

plsql.employees_seq.nextval # SELECT employees_seq.NEXTVAL FROM dual
plsql.employees_seq.currval # SELECT employees_seq.CURRVAL FROM dual

SELECT

# select one record
plsql.employees.first # SELECT * FROM employees
                      # fetch first row => {:employee_id => ..., :first_name => '...', ...}
plsql.employees.first(:employee_id => 1)  # SELECT * FROM employees WHERE employee_id = 1
plsql.employees.first("WHERE employee_id = 1")
plsql.employees.first("WHERE employee_id = :employee_id", 1)
# select many records
plsql.employees.all                       # => [{...}, {...}, ...]
plsql.employees.all(:order_by => :employee_id)
plsql.employees.all("WHERE employee_id > :employee_id", 5)
# count records
plsql.employees.count                     # SELECT COUNT(*) FROM employees
plsql.employees.count("WHERE employee_id > :employee_id", 5)

UPDATE

# update records
plsql.employees.update(:first_name => 'Second', :where => {:employee_id => 1})
                      # UPDATE employees SET first_name = 'Second' WHERE employee_id = 1

DELETE

# delete records
plsql.employees.delete(:employee_id => 1) # DELETE FROM employees WHERE employee_id = 1

Other SQL statements

Any other SELECT statement can be executed with

plsql.select :first, "SELECT ..."
# or
plsql.select :all, "SELECT ..."

or any other non-SELECT SQL statement can be executed with

plsql.execute "..."

And also COMMIT or ROLLBACK could be executed simply with

plsql.commit
plsql.rollback

I plan to write a separate blog post about how I recommend to create PL/SQL unit tests using Ruby and ruby-plsql and RSpec.

Install

As always you can install latest version of ruby-plsql with

gem install ruby-plsql

Latest gem version is just on Gemcutter but now it should be available as default gem source for all Ruby installations.

And as always ruby-plsql is supported both on

  • Ruby 1.8.6/1.8.7 or Ruby 1.9.1 with ruby-oci8 gem version 2.0.3 or later (some specific issues with complex data types will be fixed in later versions of ruby-oci8)
  • JRuby 1.3/1.4 with Oracle JDBC driver (testing mainly with ojdbc14.jar but also ojdbc5.jar or ojdbc6.jar should be fine)

Please try it out and tell me if there are any issues with some particular data types or if there are still some unsupported PL/SQL data types that you would like to be supported in ruby-plsql. And also I encourage you to try ruby-plsql out for PL/SQL unit testing if you had no PL/SQL unit tests previously :)

Advertisements

September 28, 2009

New features in ActiveRecord Oracle enhanced adapter version 1.2.2

Filed under: jruby,oracle,oracle-enhanced,rails,ruby — Raimonds Simanovskis @ 7:55 pm

During the last months many new features have been implemented for ActiveRecord Oracle enhanced adapter which are now included in Oracle enhanced adapter version 1.2.2. You can find full list in change history file, here I will tell about the main ones.

Documentation

Now Oracle enhanced adapter has improved RDoc documentation for all public methods. So you can go to RDoc documentation of installed gem or go and view published documentation on-line.

Schema definition

There are many new features in schema definition methods that you can use in migration files:

  • When you use add_index then ActiveRecord is automatically generating index name using format index_table_name_on_column1_and_column2_… which previously could cause Oracle errors as Oracle identifiers should be up to 30 characters long. Now default index names are automatically shortened down to 30 or less characters (of course you can always use also :name option to specify shortened version by yourself).
  • Now adapter is ignoring :limit option for :text and :binary columns (as in Oracle you cannot specify limit for CLOB and BLOB data types). Previously it could cause errors if you tried to migrate Rails application from e.g. MySQL where :text and :binary columns could have :limit in schema definition.
  • If you define :string column with :limit option then it will define VARCHAR2 column with size in characters and not in bytes (this makes difference if you use UTF-8 with language where one character might be stored as several bytes). This is expected behavior from ActiveRecord that you define maximum string size in UTF-8 characters.
  • Now you can use add_foreign_key and remove_foreign_key to define foreign key constraints in migrations (see RDoc documentation for details). Syntax and some implemenatation for foreign key definition was taken from foreigner Rails plugin as well as some ideas taken from active_record_oracle_extensions plugin.
  • add_foreign_key definitions will be also extracted in schema.rb by rake db:schema:dump task. Therefore they will be also present in test database when you will recreate it from schema.rb file.
  • Foreign keys are also safe for loading of fixtures (in case you are still using them instead of factories :)). disable_referential_integrity method is implemented for Oracle enhanced adapter which is called by ActiveRecord before loading fixtures and which disables all currently active foreign key constraints during loading of fixtures.
  • You can use add_synonym and remove_synonym to define database synonyms to other tables, views or sequences. add_synonym definitions will also be extracted in schema.rb file.
  • It is possible to create tables with primary key trigger. There will be no difference in terms how you would create new records in such table using ActiveRecord but in case you have also need to do direct INSERTs into the table then it will be easier as you can omit primary key from INSERT statement and primary key trigger will populate it automatically from corresponding sequence.
  • ActiveRecord schema dumper is patched to work correctly when default table prefixes or suffixes are used – they are now removed from schema.rb dump to avoid duplicate prefixes and suffixes when recreating schema from schema.rb.

Legacy schema support

Some features which can support “weird” legacy database schemas:

  • If you are using ActiveRecord with legacy schema which have tables with triggers that populate primary key triggers (and not using default Rails and Oracle enhanced adapter conventions) then you can use set_sequence_name :autogenerated in class definition to tell adapter to omit primary key value from INSERTs.
  • You can use ActiveRecord also with tables that you can access over database link. To do that you need to define local synonym to remote table (and also remote sequence if you want to insert records as well) and then use local synonym in set_table_name in class definition. Previously adapter could not get remote table columns, now it will get table columns also over database link.
    But still you cannot specify remote table (like “table_name@db_link”) directly in set_table_name as table_name will be used as column prefix in generated SQL statements where “@db_link” will not be valid syntax.
    And when you define local synonyms then please use the new add_synonym feature :)

Connection options

  • cursor_sharing option default value is changed from “similar” to “force” – please read explanation in discussion group post what it is and why the new default value is recommended choice.
  • When using JRuby and JDBC you can set TNS_ADMIN environment variable to tnsnames.ora directory and then use TNS database alias in database.yml file (specify just database: option and remove host: option). This might be useful for more complex TNS connection definitions, e.g. connection to load balanced Oracle RAC.
  • Adapter will not raise error if it cannot locate ojdbc14.jar file. So either put it in $JRUBY_HOME/lib or ensure that it will be loaded by application server. Would love to hear feedback from people who are using this adapter with JRuby to find out if this behaves well now :)

Logging

  • Now you can get PL/SQL debugging information into your ActiveRecord log file. Use dbms_output.put_line in your PL/SQL procedures and functions (that are called from ActiveRecord models) and in your ActiveRecord model use connection.enable_dbms_output and connection.disable_dbms_output around your database calls to get dbms_output logging information into ActiveRecord log file. But please use it just in development environment with debug log level as in production it would add too much overhead for each database call. And this feature also requires that you install ruby-plsql gem.

As you see this probably is the largest “point” release that I have had :) Thanks also to other contributors which patches were included in this release.

As always you can install Oracle enhanced adapter on any Ruby platform (Ruby 1.8.6 / 1.8.7 or Ruby 1.9.1 or JRuby) with

gem install activerecord-oracle_enhanced-adapter

If you have any questions please use discussion group or post comments here.

July 21, 2009

Initial version of DataMapper Oracle adapter

Filed under: datamapper,jruby,ruby — Raimonds Simanovskis @ 6:52 pm

datamapper.jpg

What is DataMapper?

DataMapper is Ruby Object/Relational Mapper that is similar to ActiveRecord (component of Ruby on Rails) but still it handles several things differently than ActiveRecord.

I got interested in DataMapper because I liked better some of its design decisions when compared with ActiveRecord. And in particular DataMapper architecture can suite better if you need to work with legacy Oracle database schemas – that is the area where I use Ruby on Rails a lot and for these purposes I also created Oracle enhanced adapter for ActiveRecord.

But as there were no Oracle adapter available for DataMapper I needed to create one :) I started to work on Oracle adapter for DataMapper after the RailsConf and now it is passing all DataMapper tests on all Ruby platforms – MRI 1.8, Ruby 1.9 and JRuby 1.3.

Why DataMapper for Oracle database?

If you would like to learn main differences between DataMapper and ActiveRecord then please start with this overview and this summary of benefits.

Here I will mention specific benefits if you would like to use DataMapper with Oracle database.

Model properties

In DataMapper you always specify in model class definition what Ruby “type” you would like to use for each model attribute (or property as called in DataMapper):

class Post
  include DataMapper::Resource
  property :id,         Serial
  property :title,      String
  property :post_date,  Date
  property :created_at, DateTime
  property :updated_at, Time
end

The main benefit for that is that you can explicitly define when to use Ruby Time, Date or DateTime class which is stored as DATE (or sometimes as TIMESTAMP) in Oracle database. In addition you can define your own custom DataMapper types and define how to serialize them into database.

Composite primary keys

DataMapper core library supports composite primary keys for models. If you use ActiveRecord then there is an option to use additional composite_primary_keys gem but it regularly breaks with latest ActiveRecord versions and quite often it also might break in some edge cases. In DataMapper composite primary keys are defined quite simple:

class City
  include DataMapper::Resource
  property :country,   String, :key => true
  property :name,      String, :key => true
end

Legacy schemas

DataMapper is quite useful when you want to put Ruby models on top of existing Oracle schemas. It is possible to provide different database field name for property or provide custom sequence name for primary keys:

class Post
  include DataMapper::Resource
  property :id, Serial, :field => "post_id", :sequence => "post_s"  
end

You can also define one model that can be persisted in two different repositories (e.g. databases or schemas) and use different naming conventions in each repository:

class Post
  include DataMapper::Resource
  repository(:old) do
    property :id, Serial, :field => "post_id", :sequence => "post_s"
  end
  repository(:default) do
    property :id, Serial
  end
end

As a result DataMapper can be used also for data migration between different databases.

Bind variables

ActiveRecord always generates SQL statements for execution as one single string. Therefore Oracle enhanced adapter always initializes Oracle session with setting cursor_sharing=’similar’. It instructs Oracle always to take all literals (constants) from SQL statement and replace them with bind variables. It reduces the number of unique SQL statements generated but also it is some overhead for Oracle optimizer.

DataMapper always passes all statement parameters separately to corresponding database adapter and therefore it is possible for Oracle adapter to pass all parameters as bind variables to Oracle.

CLOB and BLOB values inserting and selecting

As for ActiveRecord all inserted values should be passed as literals in INSERT statement it was not possible to insert large CLOB and BLOB values directly in INSERT statement. Therefore ActiveRecord Oracle enhanced adapter did separate call-backs for inserting any CLOB or BLOB data after INSERT of other data. In DataMapper it is possible to insert all data at once as CLOB and BLOB data are passed as bind variables.

DataMapper also handles better lazy loading of large columns. So if you define property as Text then by default it will not be selected from database – it will be selected separately only when you use it. Typically it could reduce amount of data that needs to be sent from database to application as Text properties are quite often not needed in e.g. all web pages.

Wny not DataMapper?

If you are fine with ActiveRecord default conventions and you don’t have any issues that I listed previously then probably ActiveRecord is good enough for you and you shouldn’t change to DataMapper. There are of course much more Rails plugins that work with ActiveRecord but not yet with DataMapper. And DataMapper is still much less used and therefore there might some edge cases where it is not tested and you will need to find the issue causes by yourself.

But if you like to try new things then please try it out – and also DataMapper community is quite friendly and helpful and will help to solve any issues :)

Installation of DataMapper Oracle adapter

So if you have decided to try to use DataMapper with Oracle database then follow the instructions how to install it.

Oracle support is done for current development version 0.10.0 of DataMapper – therefore you will need to install the latest versions from GitHub (they are still not published as gems on RubyForge).

DataMapper with Oracle adapter can be used both on MRI 1.8.6 (I am not testing it on 1.8.7) and Ruby 1.9.1 as well as on JRuby 1.3. And currently installation is tested on Mac OS X and Linux – if there is anyone interested in Windows support then please let me know.

MRI 1.8.6 or Ruby 1.9.1

At first you need to have the same preconditions as for ActiveRecord:

  • Oracle Instant Cient
  • ruby-oci8 gem, version 2.0.2 or later

If you are using Mac then you can use these instructions for installation (but instead of compiling ruby-oci8 library just install ruby-oci8 gem).

Now at first it is necessary to install DataObjects Oracle driver – DataObjects library is unified interface to relational databases (like SQLite, MySQL, PostgreSQL, Oracle) that DataMapper uses to access these databases.

At first validate that you have the latest version of rubygems installed and install necessary additional gems:

gem update --system
gem install addressable -v 2.0

As I mentioned currently you need to install the latest version from GitHub (at first create and go to directory where you would like to store DataMapper sources):

git clone git://github.com/datamapper/extlib.git
cd extlib
git checkout -b next --track origin/next
rake install
cd ..
git clone git://github.com/datamapper/do.git
cd do
git checkout -b next --track origin/next
cd data_objects
rake install
cd ../do_oracle
rake compile
rake install
cd ../..

Now if DataObjects installation was successful you can install DataMapper. UPDATE: Oracle adapter is now in “next” branch of DataMapper so now you need to install it form there:

git clone git://github.com/datamapper/dm-core.git
cd dm-core
git checkout -b next --track origin/next
rake install

Now start irb and test if you can connect to Oracle database (change database name, username and password according to your setup):

require "rubygems"
require "dm-core"
DataMapper.setup :default, "oracle://hr:hr@xe"

and try some basic DataMapper operations (I assume that you don’t have posts table in this schema):

class Post
  include DataMapper::Resource
  property :id,     Serial, :sequence => "posts_seq"
  property :title,  String
end
DataMapper.auto_migrate!
p = Post.create(:title=>"Title")
Post.get(p.id)
Post.auto_migrate_down!

JRuby

At first I assume that you have already installed JRuby latest version (1.3.1 at the moment).

Then you need to place Oracle JDBC driver ojdbc14.jar file in JRUBY_HOME/lib directory (other option is just to put somewhere in PATH).

All other installation should be done in the same way – just use “jruby -S gem” instead of “gem” and “jruby -S rake” instead of “rake” and it should install necessary gems for JRuby.

In addition before installing do_oracle gem you need to install do_jdbc gem (which contains general JDBC driver functionality):

# after installation of data_objects gem
cd ../do_jdbc
jruby -S rake compile
jruby -S rake install
# continue with do_oracle installation

Other DataMapper gems

DataMapper is much more componentized than ActiveRecord. Here I described how to install just the main dm-core gem. You can see the list of other gems in DataMapper web site.

To install additional DataMapper gems you need to

git clone git://github.com/datamapper/dm-more.git
cd dm-more
git checkout -b next --track origin/next
cd dm-some-other-gem
rake install

Questions?

This was my first attempt to describe how to start to use DataMapper with Oracle. If you have any questions or something is not working for you then please write comments and I will try to answer and fix any issues in these instructions.

April 21, 2009

ruby-plsql new version – Ruby 1.9.1 support and more

Filed under: jruby,oracle,pl/sql,rails,ruby — Raimonds Simanovskis @ 1:20 pm

I have released ruby-plsql gem (Ruby API for Oracle PL/SQL procedure calls) new version 0.3.0 which includes several new features.

Ruby 1.9.1

Probably the most important is support for Ruby 1.9.1 – now you can use both Oracle enhanced adapter and ruby-plsql gem on all three major Ruby plaforms:

  • MRI 1.8.6 with ruby-oci8 1.0.x library or gem
  • Ruby/YARV 1.9.1 with ruby-oci8 2.0 library or gem (currently just trunk version of ruby-oci8 2.0 contains the last bug fixes for Ruby 1.9.1)
  • JRuby (so far tested with 1.1.6) with JDBC Oracle driver

ActiveRecord connection

In addition usage of ruby-plsql gem in Ruby on Rails project is simplified. Now you can include in environment.rb or some initializer file just:

plsql.activerecord_class = ActiveRecord::Base

and you don’t need to specify plsql.connection anymore – it will always use current ActiveRecord connection. This is also useful when ActiveRecord reestablishes connection to database as you don’t need to reestablish plsql connection in this case.

In addition if you use several different connections to Oracle database then you can assign to plsql.activerecord_class also different class that inherits from ActiveRecord::Base and has connection to different database.

Database time zone

Also you can also specify in which timezone DATE values are stored in database:

plsql.default_timezone = :local

or

plsql.default_timezone = :utc

This will affect how DATE values (without timezone) will be converted to Time or DateTime values (with timezone), default selection is :local timezone. If you have set plsql.activerecord_class then the value will be taken from ActiveRecord::Base.default_timezone.

BLOB support

You can now use BLOB data type for input and output parameters and function return values.
I remind you that also NUMBER, VARCHAR2, DATE, TIMESTAMP and CLOB data types are supported,

Synonym support

Now you can also use private and public database synonyms to functions or procedures or packages.
E.g. if ORA_LOGIN_USER is public database synonym to SYS.LOGIN_USER function then instead of

plsql.sys.login_user

you can use

plsql.ora_login_user

Installation

To install the gem as always do

sudo gem install ruby-plsql

or call the correct gem command version for JRuby or Ruby 1.9.1.

Source code of ruby-plsql is located at GitHub where you can find usage examples in RSpec tests.

March 23, 2009

ActiveRecord Oracle enhanced adapter also on JRuby and Ruby 1.9

Filed under: jruby,oracle,oracle-enhanced,rails,ruby — Raimonds Simanovskis @ 1:01 am

So far if you wanted to use Ruby on Rails on Oracle database you needed to use different adapters depending on the Ruby platform that you wanted to use. If you used original MRI (Matz Ruby interpreter) 1.8.6 then hopefully you were using Oracle enhanced adapter. But if you wanted to use JRuby then you needed to use JDBC adapter that is maintained by JRuby team (and which sometimes might work differently than Oracle enhanced adapter). And if you wanted to use new Ruby 1.9.1 then you were out of luck as no adapter supported it.

Therefore I wanted to announce great news that ActiveRecord Oracle enhanced adapter 1.2.0 is released and it supports all three major Ruby platforms!

  • Use Oracle enhanced adapter on MRI 1.8.6 with ruby-oci8 1.0.x library or gem
  • Use Oracle enhanced adapter on JRuby (so far tested with 1.1.6) with JDBC Oracle driver
  • Use Oracle enhanced adapter on Ruby/YARV 1.9.1 with ruby-oci8 2.0 library or gem

This provides you with much more flexibility to develop on one Ruby platform but deploy on another and on all three platforms you can use the same additional functionality that Oracle enhanced adapter provides on top of standard ActiveRecord functionality.

And during testing of Oracle enhanced adapter on all platforms additional milestone was achieved – Oracle enhanced adapter passes 100% ActiveRecord unit tests! But to be honest I need to tell that I needed to patch quite many unit tests for Oracle specifics as not all SQL that runs on MySQL is also valid on Oracle. I published my patched branch of ActiveRecord unit tests at my GitHub fork of Rails – you can clone the repository and verify by yourself.

So please try out new version of Oracle enhanced adapter on any Ruby platform:

gem install activerecord-oracle_enahnced-adapter

If you have any questions please use discussion group or post comments here. In nearest future I will also add more instructions how to install Oracle enhanced adapter on JRuby and Ruby 1.9.1 at GitHub wiki page.

June 26, 2008

ruby-plsql gem now supports JRuby and Oracle JDBC driver

Filed under: jruby,oracle,pl/sql,ruby — Raimonds Simanovskis @ 9:11 pm

Some time ago I created ruby-plsql gem which provides simple Ruby API for Oracle PL/SQL stored procedures.

Initially this gem supported just MRI with ruby-oci8 library which provides connectivity to Oracle database as this was my main development and production environment for Ruby & Oracle applications. But as JRuby is fast growing alternative Ruby deployment platform and as it can be integrated into Oracle Fusion middleware platform (e.g. Oracle Mix is running on JRuby on Oracle Fusion middleware) then I planned to support JRuby as well.

I started to work on JRuby support during RailsConf JRuby hackfest and initially this did not seem very hard task for me. But as I did not know JDBC very well it took me much more time than initially planned. And unfortunately JDBC is also much less powerful compared to ruby-oci8 library for construction of dynamic PL/SQL calls. In addition I needed to strugle with Ruby and JDBC data type mappings which differs from Ruby and ruby-oci8 data type mappings.

But finally I have completed JRuby support and released ruby-plsql gem version 0.2.0. And good news are that from usage perspective ruby-plsql behaves identically on MRI and JRuby – at least my RSpec tests are telling so.

To install this gem on JRuby execute

sudo jruby -S gem install ruby-plsql

or

sudo jgem install ruby-plsql

depending on how you have installed JRuby on your computer.

Source code of ruby-plsql is located on GitHub where you can find usage examples in RSpec tests.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.